Tropical Storm Isaias

Bill’s Blog

Posted: Jul 30, 2020 / 01:27 PM EDT Updated: Aug 2, 2020 / 01:30 PM EDT

SUN. PM UPDATE Isaias is a tropical storm with peak winds of 65 mph over the open ocean. The fastest wind on land at an airport at 1 pm Sunday was at Vero Beach – NE 25 gust to 32 mph. Buoys offshore are showing gusts to 40 mph. The central pressure of the storm remains at 29.32″ and that’s not very deep by tropical storm standards. It’s not impossible that the storm may intensify back to hurricane strength, but for now this is not a major storm. The center of the storm is less than 50 miles from the east Florida Coast and it will continue to hug the coast, with the fastest winds offshore over open water.

We are already down to the letter “I” in the Atlantic/Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico. This is Hurricane “Isaias”. This is pronounced “ee-sah-EE-ahs”. Here’s the current track of the storm:

cone graphic

* If the storm is forecast to dissipate within 3 days, the “Full Forecast” and “3 day” graphic will be identical

As I write this, the National Hurricane Center has Tropical Storm Warnings for the Florida Coast and a Tropical Storm Watch for the coasts of the Carolinas. Here’s a look at when to expect the strongest winds:

time of arrival graphic

* If the storm is forecast to dissipate within 3 days, the “Full Forecast” and “3 day” graphic will be identical

Here’s the probability of tropical storm winds

https://michigandailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/tropical-storm-isaias-2.png

Here’s SE U.S. Regional Radar:

Southeast sector loop
Go to: Most Recent Image

Here’s a link to Bahamas radar. And here’s Miami radar:

Click for latest Base Reflectivity radar loop from the Miami, FL radar and current weather warnings
Click for latest Composite Reflectivity radar image from the Melbourne, FL radar and current weather warnings
Melbourne Florida radar
Click for latest Base Reflectivity radar image from the Jacksonville, FL radar and current weather warnings
Jacksonville Florida radar

Here’s Puerto Rico radar (the storm has passed Puerto Rico):

Click for latest Composite Reflectivity radar image from the Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands radar and current weather warnings

Click on the links for: The Public Advisory, Public Forecast, Forecast Discussion, Wind History, Key Messages, Key Messages in Spanish. Here’s a satellite loop:

https://michigandailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/tropical-storm-isaias.gif

As the storm comes up the east coast…the hottest and most humid air should stay south of Michigan and our temperatures should remain near or a little cooler than average (average highs are in the low 80s).

The next tropical storm will be called Josephine. That’s already starting to take shape west of Africa and should be no threat to the U.S.

Also: While the Atlantic has been spawning tropical storm after tropical storm…it’s been record quiet in the Western Pacific – also no tropical storms in the Indian Ocean. Neat lightning pic. from the French Alps.